Correlation of Psychosocial Support Concerns and Depression in Deaf Adults at Nairobi and Kajiado Counties, Kenya

Authors

  • Ms. Joyce W. Ngugi United States International University-Africa, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Dr. Dana Basnight-Brown Center for Cognitive and Developmental Psychology
  • Dr. Josephine N. Arasa United States International University – Africa (USIU – A)

Abstract

The Deaf are considered persons with disabilities due to societal stigma resulting in inequality and discrimination. The sequential mixed methodology utilized a cross-sectional approach, with interviews translated and administered in Kenyan Sign Language. The MMSE screened for mental status, while PHQ-9 assessed for depression and WSAS for Psychosocial Support Concerns (PSS) concerns. Researcher-designed in-depth interviews and explored qualitative themes. In addition, Focus Group Discussions, ethnographic observation checklists, and mental health providers’ key informant interviews corroborated the data. Deaf adults (N=100, 83% response rate) reported inadequate counseling access (62%), while 55% reported no depression. However, 45% depicted clinically significant depression levels, with 28% of Deaf adults also indicating suicidality. Content analyses revealed family, socioeconomic welfare and stigma as the top PSS concerns. The study found a significant positive correlation between depression and overall PSS concerns at 0.225 (p=0.024) and home management PSS concern with depression at 0.253 (p=0.011). ANOVA analyses revealed statistically significant differences between the depression categories’ effects on PSS concerns, F = 3.22, p =.026. T-tests analyses indicated that means for None and Mild Depression (M=8.93, SD=8.80) were significantly lower than for Severe depression, t (13) = -3.16, p = .007, 95% CI [-15.15, -2.85]; and Moderately Severe (M=12.64, SD=7.40) were significantly lower than for Severe depression, t (13) -2.67, p = .019, 95% CI [-9.57, -1.00]. The study's implications are to design Deaf-friendly assessments. The study recommends Deaf-centric interventions and, for further research, a national census on Deaf mental health and the development of instruments normed for Kenyan Deaf populations.

 

 

Author Biographies

Ms. Joyce W. Ngugi, United States International University-Africa, Nairobi, Kenya

 

 

Dr. Dana Basnight-Brown, Center for Cognitive and Developmental Psychology

 

 

 

Dr. Josephine N. Arasa, United States International University – Africa (USIU – A)

 

 

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Published

2022-12-21

How to Cite

Ngugi, J. W., Basnight-Brown, D. ., & Arasa, J. N. . (2022). Correlation of Psychosocial Support Concerns and Depression in Deaf Adults at Nairobi and Kajiado Counties, Kenya. Impact: Journal of Transformation, 5(2), 124–148. Retrieved from https://library.africainternational.edu/index.php/impact/article/view/133